2012 Februar : design elements

29
Feb

Wednesday Mix

categories Wednesday Mix    

design: Kelly Hoppen

where is the cool

28
Feb

Interview with Cara Cummins

categories Designer, Interviews    

Cara Cummins with her architect husband Jose Tavel and their rescue dogs

It is my pleasure to introduce Cara Cummins -  principal in TaC Studios, architect, designer and the first J. Neel Reid Prize winner. Cara’s home is one of my favorite homes ever featured in Metropolitan Home. Enjoy the interview and the photos of Cara and Jose’s beautiful Atlanta home!

How would you describe your own style?

I am driven by function and purpose, utility is my style.

Looking back at your first project what decorating knowledge do you wish you had back then designing the interiors?

Have no fear, and avoid perfect.


Is there a designer that has influenced you?

Ray Eames, Clodagh, John Pawson, Anne Fougeron, Charles-Édouard Jeannere aka Le Corbusier, Eileen Grey.

Some designers believe that the first piece for any room is the rug or a painting that sets up the colors palette. What is your first source of inspiration?

Typically I am inspired by the purpose of the space, the view, the quality of light, or when working with a client they may have an existing object. Color is always abstract until placed in the context of the space and it’s light .


How do you achieve a good scale? Scale is a really interesting and difficult topic.

Scale is always coupled with proportion. Often we will change the ceiling height in the space to better define that space, to break it away from the whole. The feeling of compressed space at an entry, coupled with the relief of that space can create a transition that breaks away from the life outside the entry.

What do you love to do when you are not designing?

Making that design come to life, entertaining or being entertained.

Who are your favorite artists?

Currently Louise Bourgeois, she was so honest and brave in her work.


Your favorite books?

Anything by Anis Nin, Umberto Eco, Italo Calvino, the list is too long.

What does success mean to you?

Always having something that must be done.


My signature Design Elements question – what are the most important design elements?

Light, understanding the how, the why, and the when.

photos: Mali Azima for Metropolitan Home via Elle Decor

27
Feb

Monday Dreaming

categories Hospitality, Hotels, Monday dreaming    

Montagsträume… Qasr Al Sarab Desert Resort, Location: 150 km SSW von Abu Dhabi in der Liwa Oase am nördlichen Rand der Rub al-Chali Wüste – eine der größten zusammenhängenden Sandwüsten der Erde. Einen guten Wochenstart!

Monday dreaming of… Qasr Al Sarab – a dreamlike retreat located 150 km SSW of Abu Dhabi in the Liwa oasis on the northern edge of the Rub’ al Khali desert (one of the largest uninterrupted sand deserts in the world). Happy new week!


honestly wtf

27
Feb

Kitchens I Love

categories Kitchen    

photos: 1. Peter Estersohn for Elle Decor, 2. daily dream decor

25
Feb

Leftovers

categories Leftovers    

Fotos von dieser Woche, die ich noch nicht gepostet habe. Schönes Wochenende!

Images from this week that didn’t make it into posts. Happy weekend!

the dedicated gentleman

Jacobsen Architecture, photo: Robert C. Lautman for AD

design: Lori Dennis, photo Grey Crawford for Elle Decor

where is the cool

p.s.: This category is inspired by the leftovers of Japanese Trash – one of my favorite blogs

23
Feb

Amazing Places to Experience

categories Travels    

Jodhpur, India

Ice Canyon, Greenland

Rice Field Terraces in Yunnan, China

Kaieteur Falls, Guyana

The Hamilton Pool Nature Preserve in Texas, USA

Pirin Mountain, Bulgaria

Provence, France

idea: cool hunter, photos: my pinterest

20
Feb

Interview with Vicente Wolf

categories Designer, Interviews    

“The loft is my retreat. I have done exactly what I wanted to the space and filled it with objects I love in the casual way I want to live. You, too, can take your space into your own hands. I am not suggesting you copy what I’ve done, because the point is not to mimic anyone but to follow your own muse, whether you choose a designer or design yourself. What I am offering is a template – a few strategies to adopt or discard to get you started – because once you have really learned to see, you will find what you like and go your own way. Designing anything is a process and you should continue to add and subtract. Change is what keeps a space, and an individual, alive. How do you want to feel when you walk into a room? Comfortable? Tranquil? Energized? Once you know what makes you feel good, you can create a room that reflects your own emotions and sensibility. Designing is all about getting in touch with yourself.”

Vicente Wolf, “Learning to See”

I’m a huge fan of Vicente Wolf – designer extraordinaire with a definite point of view; with passion for design guided by simplicity and integrity; master of combining different styles in a way that feels effortless; extremely talented and a natural at what he does; superb photographer, passionate art collector and intrepid world traveler. Vicente Wolf has been at the top of the design industry for over 35 years. Architectural Digest included him in their “AD 100“ and he was also named one of the top 100 designers by Metropolitan Home’s “Design 100”. House Beautiful named Vicente Wolf one of the 10 most influential designers in the United States and Interior Design Magazine inducted him in its “Designer Hall of Fame”. He has received the Pantone Color Award and was named one of the “Top 20 Designers of the past 20 Years”. Vicente Wolf has published 3 books -  “Learning to See” 2002,  “Crossing Boundaries: A Global Vision of Design” 2006 and “Lifting the Curtain on Design” 2010 – all favorites of mine! I’ve posted quotes from them here and here. I’m running out of superlatives. So here is the interview. Enjoy. I sure did!

How would you describe your own style?

Spaces that are comfortable, elegant, but still relaxed with accents of different cultures and periods. The architecture shines through with clean and sharp lines.


When did you first realize that you wanted to be an interior designer?

In my early 20s.


Looking back at your first project what decorating knowledge do you wish you had back then designing the interiors?

The conviction of my vision to not use pattern. Even though the pattern was used everywhere in my first project, which neutralized it, but now I wouldn’t use pattern.

Is there a designer that has influenced you?

Yes, David Hicks.

Some designers believe that the first piece for any room is the rug or a painting that sets up the color palette. What is your first source of inspiration?

The requirements of the client, the pros and cons of the space, and my imagination.


How do you find connections between disparate things?

It is instinctual to me, and I see if they play well against each other.


How do you achieve this simplicity in your interiors?

By not using pattern, dealing with the architecture of the backgrounds in a balanced, clean way.

How do you achieve a sense of warmth and unity?

Warmth is a subliminal message that gets conveyed by a balance of shapes, tones, and a strong sense of humanity in the space.


How do you achieve a sense of good scale?

Born with it.


Please finish the sentence: The best moments of any project are:

Beginning and the end.


What do you find fascinating?

Being in places outside of my comfort zone that allow my imagination to come up with new ideas and visions.

You visited the tallest sand dunes in the world in Namibia, tribes in Papua New Guinea that were still living in complete isolation, you heard the temple bells in Bhutan… What surprised you the most?

How lost we are here in NY, and how we’ve lost the sense of what’s really important.

The treasures that you found…

I bring to my showroom, VW Home. I have the pleasure of finding them and the freedom to let them go.


Your top travel tip…

By an around-the-world ticket. It gives you the opportunity to travel to many places at a low cost.


What are for you the keys to a happy and meaningful life?

Nice clients, time off to explore, a meaningful relationship, and the freedom to eliminate the things that work against these things.

photos: Vicente Wolf

p.s.: A note by me

Some years ago I have no idea of interior design. A few months before my bar exam my husband gave me a wonderful book – it was “Learning to See”. This book has changed the way I view things. I began learning to see… It is not enough to be passionate about design. We have to stand for something. Vicente’s way inspires and reminds me of my favorite movie scene. In “Indecent Proposal” an architect (Woody Harrelson as David Murphy) stands in front of his students talking about architecture and great architects. His words: “the great ones are impossible to deal with… because they know that if they do their jobs properly… if they just this once get it right… they can actually lift the human spirit… take it to a higher place.”

Thank you, Vicente, for doing your job properly, continually inspiring us, sharing your knowledge, taking us to a higher place…

18
Feb

Leftovers

categories Leftovers    

Fotos von dieser Woche, die ich noch nicht gepostet habe.

Images from this week that didn’t make it into posts.

Jarson Residence by will bruder+PARTNERS, photo: home dsgn

totalblur


lemon jar

p.s.: This category is inspired by the leftovers of Japanese Trash – one of my favorite blogs

15
Feb

Interview with David Hicks

categories Designer, Interviews    

It is my pleasure to introduce David Hicks – one of Australia’s leading interior designers. Enjoy the conversation and David’s extraordinary creations.

How would you describe your own style?

I describe my style as modern luxury. I am heavily influenced by the modernists for my architectural work and detailing and love a bit of luxury. So I often combine the two in my work. My architectural style is very minimal and streamlined with using a currated palette of finishes, I then layer onto this the decorative. My decorative style is very eclectic yet considered. I use pieces from different periods and cultures and love to mix and match. This is a contrast to the architectural bones of my spaces but I make it work in harmony.


What inspired you to get into design?

Ever since I was a young child I loved design. I used to make little houses in the garden out of sticks and landscape around them, driving my toy cars into the minaiture properties. I loved James Bond movies and the sets they used to design. I think it was just in my blood really. I always wanted to be an architect but decided on interiors due to the quicker change over on projects. I think I would get too bored working on a building for years and years.


Looking back at your first project what decorating knowledge do you wish you had back then designing the interiors?

My first project was very minimal. It was all white and black and very modernist. Some would consider it not to be decorative but I did. I was decorative in the sheer expanse of simple materials used. The materials became the decoration and the precisely placed modern furniture. I suppose if I had more of an insight, as I do now, into decoration the space may have been a bit softer, but having said that it is one of my favourite projects.

Is there a designer that has influenced you?

I am going to say what most architects say, Mies van der Rohe. I love his work. I am also influenced by Lautner and Neutra and the Los Angeles modernism. I am influenced by people in fashion such as Tom Ford and from movies. As mentioned before I have been hugely influenced by the sets of the old James Bond movies.


Some designers believe that the first piece for any room is the rug or a painting that sets up the colors palette. What is your first source of inspiration?

This changes from project to project. I generally do not start with any one thing. The palette seems to just build up by itself. I am primarily more concerned with the bones of a space. This then allows for beautiful decoration. Once the materials of the space have been defined I then look at the decorative. This usually starts with a loose theme and is built up from there. Paintings, rugs, furniture upholstery and furniture itself are really layered to create a whole. I do not start with just one thing.


How do you achieve a good scale?  Scale is a really interesting and difficult topic.

Scale is very important in design. It is what we as human beings relate to in a space. It is also what can make a space feel comfortable or uncomfortable. I often play with scale to create a bit of personality to a space. This come naturally to me and works most times. I do not labour over the size of things, rather trust my instincts and just go with it.

What do you love to do when you are not designing?

I love travelling. This is what really inspires me and feeds me. I like food, good wine and googling anything and everything on the Internet. Google is such an amazing thing. I can spend hours and hours on google.


Who are your favorite artists?

My favourite artists would have to be Meadmore, Australian working in America, for his amazing bronze sculptures; Dale Frank, Australian, for his amazing use of color; Curtis Jere, an American artist, for his now vintage creations and Charles Hollis Jones, another American for his work in lucite.

Your favorite books?

You know it’s terrible, I do not tend to read much. I am a visual person and love picture books. I do not really have a favourite as I love most picture based books. If I had to say I really like books on Helmut Newton photography and Mies van der Rohe architecture.

What does success mean to you?

Success is what you make it. I am always striving for success. I think most designers are subconsciously. It is the art of trying to be better and better and better. This is what drives me, the desire to perfect my craft. To make money doing this is success.


My signature Design Elements question – what are the most important design elements?

The most important design elements are space and materials. If the architectural space is not beautiful then the decoration will not be successful. Detail and how the space is put together is very important to me.

photos: David Hicks

13
Feb

Monday Dreaming

categories Houses, Monday dreaming    

Montagsträume… ein Haus am Strand in Costa Careyes, Mexiko. Einen guten Wochenstart!

Monday dreaming… of this house with breathtaking views in Costa Careyes, Mexico. Have a good week!

digsdigs

Next Page →